SWF Book Launch: Discussion on Big Mole and Spider Boys

I’ll be speaking at this discussion in less than a fortnight!

SWF Book Launch: Discussion on Big Mole and Spider Boys
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015
Time: 7pm to 8pm
Venue: The Arts House

After making waves in the global literary scene for introducing Singaporean literature to an international audience, the highly anticipated sequel to Ming Cher’s Spider Boys, Big Mole, has finally hit the bookshelves. Initially published in 1995 by Penguin New Zealand, Spider Boys was lauded for its use of vernacular language – and once again, this effective use of local colloquialisms has continued with Big Mole.

From Singlish to local slang words, we speak a language that is unmistakably and uniquely Singaporean. And if this everyday language is what sets the tone and scene for a homegrown story, how does it then affect our understanding of a Singaporean novel?

In this discussion, literary critic and writer Gwee Li Sui, NIE Assistant Professor Angus Whitehead and SOTA’s Subject Head of English Literature Laremy Lee will be sharing their opinions on Ming Cher’s use of language in his work, and in particular, how this feeds into his contribution to local literature.

See you there!

Interview with MyPaper for Hands Down at Going Local 4

MyPaper interviewed me for a story on Going Local 4.

Going Local is a production by Buds Theatre Company. Find out more from yesterday’s post.

The transcript of my interview, as follows:

  1. Name, age, occupation:
    Mr Laremy Lee, 32, playwright.

    I am presently a schools correspondent with The Straits Times. I will be moving to the School of the Arts, Singapore at the end of the month (June 29, 2015), to teach literature and literary arts.
  2. How do you feel about your play being picked as a feature of Going Local 4?
    It is both a privilege and an honour to be part of a proud tradition started by Buds Theatre Company’s artistic director Claire Devine.
  3. Summarise Hands Down in 14 words or less.
    A married couple discovers their incompatibility while in a competition to win a car.
  4. What inspired your passion for playwriting?
    I have always had a love for writing and the English language. Theatre is one of the avenues in which I express myself creatively.
  5. The play on paper can be vastly different from the creature on stage – are you prepared for any potential changes?
    Staging a play is like sailing a ship; with all hands on deck, everyone – from cast to crew – works to move the play forward.

    As with all ships I’ve built, I leave this vessel in the good hands of the director, who will steer it in the direction she thinks best.

    I’m fine with it taking a different tack – so long as it doesn’t go off course.
  6. What do you hope to achieve with Hands Down?
    I wrote the play in response to a trend taking place in Singapore society and mirrored in my circle of friends.Because of the way housing policy is designed, many young Singaporean couples ballot for public housing at a young age.

    When the key arrives some years later, some of these couples – having grown in age and maturity – realise they are not as in love with each other as they used to be.

    Understandably, the sunk cost is, sometimes, perceived as greater than the benefits of backing out of the impending nuptials. These couples end up entering an unhappy marriage, along with all its attendant ills.

    Is there a better way for Singapore to enact pro-marriage policies, while balancing housing considerations in a country with limited land? Or is it a case of mismatched expectations versus a practical reality, when it comes to finding a companion and a life partner? I hope the play gets people to start thinking about these issues – or even finding a solution, if possible.
  7. What are some memorable things theatre practitioners have said to you?
    One common sentiment expressed by many writers – playwrights, poets, novelists, etc. – whom I know: For every play that goes to stage, or every book that goes to print, there are dozens more that remain as unfinished drafts or rejected manuscripts, languishing in the bottom of the drawer.

    The Pareto principle suggests that 80 per cent of an artist’s best output is going to come from 20 per cent of his input. So it could well be that 80 per cent of your time might be spent achieving 20 per cent of your work.

    Having said that, don’t settle for inefficiency. Learn from the mistakes you make, and and don’t make the same mistake again. Better yet – get a good mentor who gives good feedback. It’ll cut down the time you’d need to take to get to where you want to go.

Book your tickets here. If you’d like to, you can read the 2012 version of Hands Down here.

Hands Down at Going Local 4

Going Local 4 (2015)
Going Local 4 (2015)

My play, Hands Down, will be staged as part of Buds Theatre Company’s Going Local 4.

Hands Down is a comedy about a married couple that finds themselves facing off in a challenge to see who can keep their hands on a car for the longest period of time in order to win it.

The catch: whoever puts his or her hand down first loses the car – and the marriage to boot.

This year’s Going Local comprises four short plays, including Dressing Up by Gwendolyn Lee, Don’t Colour Outside Of The Lines by Jaryl George Solomon and The Untitled Funeral Play by Luke Vijay Somasundram.

There are four shows, as follows:

  • Fri, 26 June, 8pm, Tampines Primary School Black Box
  • Sat, 27 June, 7:30pm, Toa Payoh Central Community Centre
  • Fri, 3 July and Sat, 4 July, 8pm, Zhenghua Community Centre

Standard tickets are $20 while concession tickets (for students, senior citizens and national servicemen) are $15.

And if you’re a PAssion Card Holder, you get 10% off ticket prices.

Book your tickets here. If you’d like to, you can read the 2012 version of Hands Down here.